3D model fly through of Fjallsjokull

We captured thousands of images using a quadcopter, Survey 3 camera and then created the model with Agisoft Photoscan. Calibration targets on the ground geo-referenced the model. This fly-through is a screen capture from their viewer. The model-making process took around five days on a quad-core 4.4GHz PC. Models will be produced each year to monitor changes but they also help visualise moraine formation. The images captured were about 7mm/pixel resolution.

Good data coming in already from all nodes!

Here is a quick snapshot of some data from the new Fjalls site:

It is already approaching 2m distance from its original location – also the jitter on the positions is very small.

This is temperature from Rover4’s Peli case, which is the heighest on Breida and is showing good variations (X axis starts in August).

Sats used in the fixes

This long term plot for Breida’ show the number of satellites used for each fix. It shows the normal variation due to their paths in the sky. It is quite consistent throughout the winter.

Testing Piksi Multi with the 2018 fimware

In preparation for deploying more systems in Iceland this summer – I updated our spare Piksi Multis and did a garden test. It performed very well!

I set them up to fix at 10Hz but report every 5 readings – so its closer to our slow system in Iceland. The fix hopped around within about 1.5cm – which is good for my garden as the sky box is not that wide.

National Geographic Explorer Grant awarded

We have been awarded a National Geographic Explorer grant entitled “A tale of two glaciers: using web connected RTK GPS, drones and remote sensing to monitor rapid glacier retreat of two contrasting Icelandic glaciers”. This will be a two year project to examine the rapid retreat of two icelandic glaciers, using the innovative web connected dGPS system.

Even the GPS system can have faults

“At around 5 AM Pacific Time (1 PM GMT) today (March 7th) the GPS satellites started transmitting inconsistent health information causing Swift Navigation receivers to exclude measurements from any satellites supporting the L2C signal. This has resulted in degraded or unavailable position information and decreased ability to achieve an RTK Fixed solution.”

We kept an eye on the data coming in – as it is not easy to go to Iceland and update the firmware..

This plot shows how the gps behaviour changed after the march 7th announcement. Without knowing this we could have assumed it was caused by something like wet snow cover.