Adding Wifi to the moraine camera

Here Phil is installing a new Wifi link to the moraine smart-camera system. Incredibly this "cantenna" can link directly to the Holmur Wifi 16km away! We don't expect perfect connectivity but even occasional link-up will push the images to the web server in the UK.

Here Phil is installing a new Wifi link to the moraine smart-camera system. Incredibly this “cantenna” can link directly to the Holmur Wifi 16km away! We don’t expect perfect connectivity but even occasional link-up will push the images to the web server in the UK.

2008 Wired probe recovered

For the last few years we have seen more and more of the lead for the 2008 wired probe be exposed due to surface melt.  We were hoping that this year for the first time in Iceland we’d be able to recover it.  When we arrived this year we found the lead going into a stream on the surface of the glacier, and with a bit of wiggling Graeme (shown below) was able to extract the probe.

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Graeme with a wired probe from 2008 which has been recovered.

We’re looking forward to being able to open it up and see how well it has survived.

 

Fieldwork August 2013

The base station endured a severe winter again - but with more snow (which even covered the wind generator). This bent the struts a lot (and they are not easy to bend!) so we are reinforcing with scavenged parts. Phil is seen here writing notes on the state of the base station. The wind was very strong and we had to tie down anything which could fly away (Graeme's glasses did fly away though!)

The base station endured a severe winter again – but with more snow (which even covered the wind generator). This bent the struts a lot (and they are not easy to bend!) so we are reinforcing with scavenged parts. Phil is seen here writing notes on the state of the base station. The wind was very strong and we had to tie down anything which could fly away (Graeme’s glasses did fly away though!)

working on the moraine systems

this automatic time-lapse camera should take photos of the glacier using a normal logitech webcam. The Beagle-based system survived the whole winter on its two big batteries but the day we left it in october its waterproof usb plug lost connection sadly. It is now set up so we should see the melting of the snow revealing our equipment hopefully!

this automatic time-lapse camera should take photos of the glacier using a normal logitech webcam. The Beagle-based system survived the whole winter on its two big batteries but the day we left it in october its waterproof usb plug lost connection sadly. It is now set up so we should see the melting of the snow revealing our equipment hopefully!

we have so many batteries in the dGPS cases we're investigating using a small petrol generator to charge them after they lost all charge over  the winter. Phil is in the background testing the webcam node.

we have so many batteries in the dGPS cases we’re investigating using a small petrol generator to charge them after they lost all charge over the winter. Phil is in the background testing the webcam node.

White-out

We’ve returned from the mountain very early today as whilst we could actually drive to our usual parking space we could only see about 3 meters. So we’ve come back to the farm to charge some batteries and do other jobs.

Our Dacia Duster on the road back from the glacier, between walls of about 2m high snow,

Our Dacia Duster on the road back from the glacier, between walls of about 1.8m high snow.

Data retrieval

We’ve just got back from the September trip to the glacier to do some maintenance and generally prepare the systems for the winter.  Whilst there Alex filmed us attempting (and succeeding in) getting data from the probes deployed in the summer.

Leaving to Iceland

Well, the day has finally arrived! Today we head off to Iceland for deployment.

What a roller-coaster the last few weeks have been! No time to do anything except eat, sleep and breath probes, geophones, gps’s, radios and antennas! I still have to build a hardware SSN this morning, and once thats done we head off on a jetplane.

So last week we packed the Landrover and a little funny VW bus – which looked a little like a teddy bear. By the time it was filled it definitely was a fat little teddy bear packed full with GPSs, jetwash and allsorts. Just some of the things ready for packing

Alex and Phil drove the two cars up to Immingham with the geography support guy Peter driving another car to bring them back in.
Landy ready to go
Kirk and I meanwhile tried to get some understanding on the antenna side of things with a quick tour of the VNA (Vector Network Analyser) with Reuben. We discovered quite a few ineresting things about what we believed were good antennas, and what really were good antennas. Afterwards, Dennis Nicole helped Kirk with a little mini-VNA device which we are luckily taking with us to test antennas in the Ice.

The rest of the week we rapidly built and tested portions of the code to ensure low power sleep, scheduling and other funny things…